Native American Battles Fought in Jupiter Area

Native American Battles Fought in Jupiter Area

Lorea Thomson
Posted by Lorea Thomson
Updated on
|
Published in Arts & Culture

Many residents of Palm Beach County are unaware that Jupiter, Florida was the site of three distinct wars. Native Americans occupied this territory and are honored to this day.  Many names of our towns are named in honor of the indigenous people who once lived here.  Names such as Tequesta and Miami are names of Native American tribes that once lived here. The Loxahatchee River was not originally named "Loxahatchee".  It is an Anglicized version of the river's earliest Seminole name, "Locha-hatchee" meaning turtle river.  The Seminoles occupied much of Florida.  After the American Revolution, Spain regained control of Florida from Britain. The Seminoles set up farms and acquired land grants from the Spanish.

The Seminole Wars, also known as the Florida Wars, were a series of three battles between the Seminole Indians and the U.S. military from 1816-1858. They were the longest, most expensive Indian wars in U.S. history both monetarily and lives lost. The U.S. began the First Seminole War (1817–1818) on the Florida-Georgia line, which pushed the Seminoles further south. 

In 1830 the Indian Removal Act sparked the second war as it required all natives to move to "Indian Territory"- the eastern side of the state of Oklahoma. Hundreds of soldiers were sent to the east coast of Florida with orders to capture and remove tribes from the state. The soldiers discovered a route inside of the Jupiter Inlet that led him to a Seminole camp near the Loxahatchee River. When the military invaded, but they were outnumbered, and a long battle ensued. The soldiers retreated from the “Battle of the Jupiter Inlet” and set up Fort Jupiter.  Over the following four years, the military captured and transported 600 Seminoles to Oklahoma.

In 1832, the Treaty of Payne's Landing required the indigenous inhabitants to forfeit their land and move west within a three-year window. In 1835, the U.S. Army returned to Florida to enforce the treaty and found them prepared to protect their land. The government began building forts and trading posts in native territories enforcing the movement of the Indians by treaty and forcing the Seminoles and other tribes to move to one large reservation in the center of the state. The government began building forts and trading posts in native territories enforcing the movement of the Seminoles by treaty.

At the end of the third war in 1858, American forces destroyed the remaining Native Americans' food supply, forcing them to agree to be dispatched to Oklahoma in exchange for safe passage. It is estimated 200 remaining Florida Seminoles still refused to move to Indian Country and retreated to hide deep in the Everglades.

Tags

Email Send a link to post via Email

Leave A Comment

e.g. yourwebsitename.com
Please note that your email address is kept private upon posting.

The data relating to real estate for sale on this web site comes in part from a cooperative data exchange program of the Realtor® Association of Martin County, Inc. MLS. Real estate listings held by brokerage firms other than Waterfront Properties and Club Communities are marked with the IDX logo (Broker Reciprocity) or name and detailed information about such listings includes the name of the listing brokers. Data provided is deemed reliable but is not guaranteed.

IDX information is provided exclusively for consumers' personal, non-commercial use, that it may not be used for any purpose other than to identify prospective properties consumers may be interested in purchasing.

Copyright 2024 Realtor® Association of Martin County, Inc. MLS. All rights reserved.

Listing information last updated on April 15th, 2024 at 3:07am EDT.

The data relating to real estate for sale on this web site comes in part from a cooperative data exchange program of Palm Beach Board of Realtors Multiple Listing Service. Real estate listings held by brokerage firms other than Waterfront Properties and Club Communities are marked with the listing broker's logo or name and detailed information about such listings includes the name of the listing brokers. Data provided is deemed reliable but is not guaranteed.

The broker providing this data believes them to be correct, but advises interested parties to confirm them before relying on them in a purchase decision.

© 2024 Palm Beach Board of Realtors Multiple Listing Service. All Rights Reserved.

Listing information last updated on April 15th, 2024 at 3:07am EDT.

The data relating to real estate on this web site comes in part from the Internet Data Exchange program of the MLS of the Miami Association of REALTORS®, and is updated as of April 15th, 2024 at 3:07am EDT (date/time).

All information is deemed reliable but not guaranteed by the MLS and should be independently verified. All properties are subject to prior sale, change, or withdrawal. Neither listing broker(s) nor Waterfront Properties and Club Communities shall be responsible for any typographical errors, misinformation, or misprints, and shall be held totally harmless from any damages arising from reliance upon these data. © 2024 MLS of MAR.

The information being provided is for consumers' personal, non-commercial use and may not be used for any purpose other than to identify prospective properties consumers may be interested in purchasing

Beaches Multiple Listing Service LogoAll listings featuring the BMLS logo are provided by BeachesMLS, Inc.This information is not verified for authenticity or accuracy and is not guaranteed.Copyright © 2024 BeachesMLS, Inc.

Listing information last updated on April 15th, 2024 at 3:07am EDT.