Tagged : diving

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There are 1773 documented species that occupy tropical reefs worldwide, and South Florida has the most diverse population of fish in America, with 531 species to admire. To put this into perspective, Hawaii only has 332 different reef inhabitants. From angelfish and parrotfish to sea turtles and dolphins, here are a few exciting species to look for while you're snorkeling on a reef in Palm Beach.

 

Queen Angelfish

Queen Angelfish are quite possibly some of the most beautiful and iconic fish in the sea, and acquired their name from their “crowns”, a round black/blue spot on top of their heads. Angelfish are omnivores, eating mostly sponges and algae, and they usually live alone or in pairs, so it has been theorized that they are monogamous and

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Palm Beach County has one of the most diverse marine ecosystems in the world, so snorkeling and diving one of the 181 reef sites is a magical experience. On Singer Island, the reef at Ocean Reef Park is shallow and close enough to shore to be a great spot for beginners and non-Florida natives. Since 700 feet of the beach is also protected by lifeguards, no dive flag is necessary as long as you swim in the guarded area between the buoy and shore.

At low tide, you can see the reef protruding from the ocean, and at high tide, waves crash on the shoreline rocks to explode into a natural splash fountain.

A beach wheelchair is available for use, as well as picnic areas with grills, a playground, restroom facilities, and an outdoor shower. Parking is

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On Friday, December 13th, Pura Vida Divers is spreading holiday cheer SCUBA style. The premiere dive shop on Singer Island welcomes you to mingle with the dive community, eat good food, and have the chance to win some exciting raffle prizes.

Each person who shows up will receive a raffle ticket, and you can earn extra raffle tickets by donating Toys For Tots! Prizes include a Year of FREE Dive Charters, an Atomic BC 2, an Oceanic Veo 2.0 Dive Computer, a 5,000 Cubic Foot Fill Card, and so much more!

Will you join the fun? RSVP here: info.pvd@puravidadivers.com or 561-840-8750. Check out pics from last year’s party here.

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Known as one of the prettiest fish on a Florida reef, parrotfish have vibrant patterned scales of green, blue, purple, yellow, and red. If you’re diving on one of our local natural or artificial reefs, you’re bound to see a few of these gentle beauties grazing on the bottom.

While being beautiful should be reason enough not to bring a parrotfish home for dinner, many people bring home parrotfish to keep in their aquarium for this same reason. However, there are many reasons we must leave this gorgeous grazer in the ocean!

Parrotfish spend up to 90% of their day eating algae and dead coral- basically cleaning the reef! This is so important, because without their help, reefs would be smothered by growth and die.

To top it off, after eating all of

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Earlier this year month we alerted you about $5,000 offered by FWC to the first diver who harvested and submitted an FWC-tagged lionfish from each individual reef location. With the end of the Lionfish Challenge swiftly approaching on Labor Day, FWC is turning up the heat by offering $5,000 cash to the NEXT person to find an FWC-tagged lionfish in Atlantic waters.

The statewide Lionfish Challenge began on Lionfish Removal and Awareness Day (May 19, 2018) and runs through Labor Day (Sept. 3, 2018). FWC tagged lionfish with external dart tags at 50 randomly-selected non-disclosed artificial reef sites between the depths of 80’ and 120’.

To participate, you must complete a registration form, and find and harvest an FWC-tagged lionfish, then submit

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Florida recreational divers have a little over three weeks left to cash in on rewards ranging from $500 to $5,000 for harvesting FWC-tagged lionfish.

The statewide Lionfish Challenge began on Lionfish Removal and Awareness Day (May 19, 2018) and runs through Labor Day (Sept. 3, 2018). FWC tagged lionfish with external dart tags at 50 randomly-selected non-disclosed artificial reef sites between the depths of 80’ and 120’.

To participate, you must complete a registration form, and find and harvest an FWC-tagged lionfish, then submit a clear photo of the lionfish and tag including documentation of the harvester name, tag ID#, GPS coordinates of harvest location and date harvested to Lionfish@MyFWC.com.

Cash rewards ranging from $500 to $5,000

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