Tagged : snook

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If you have a competitive streak and are looking for the biggest snook in the Jupiter area, summer is a great time to hook it. Snook has long been regarded as one of the top eating fish in South Florida. Snook meat is white with a medium firmness, not as delicate as trout but not as dense as swordfish. Snook is also one of Florida's most regulated fish. Season is closed six months of the year. 

Summer’s choppy waters have more hungry snook available for the catch.  While fishing for snook in Jupiter Inlet, keep an eye out for lighted areas on the waterway. This is where you will find them feeding on minnows and shrimp after the sun sets.  It is still possible to get lucky with snook during the winter season as well.

Jupiter Inlet fishing offers

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Photo Credit: Phlats Inshore Fishing

Snook fishing is something South Floridians are known for, and while it's a fun sport, it's tough for a beginner to figure out on their own. Snook not only puts up a powerful fight, but its mildly-firm white meat has an excellent flavor due to its diet of crustaceans and other small fish. If you're looking to catch a snook in the Jupiter area but don't know where to start, try one of our local snook charters! They take care of everything, as long as you take care of charter fee and a customary 15-20% tip!

County Line Charters
Captain Eric Lion
561.440.0312
CountyLineCharters.com
Captain Eric has been fishing the Palm Beaches his entire life, and customizes each trip to what you want to target. Boats to choose

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On February 1st, the much awaited 2021 recreational snook season opens in Palm Beach County for the duration of February, March, April, and May until the last day on May 31st. 

South Florida snook is one of the most prized and most regulated fish due to a few good reasons. Snook not only puts up a powerful fight, but its mildly-firm white meat has an excellent flavor due to its diet of crustaceans and other small fish. Because of this, if snook fishing was left unmanaged, they would surely be a rare sight.

Buying or selling a snook in the state of Florida is illegal, so if you’re dying to feast on this sly silver fish, you’ll just have to catch it yourself!

The bag limit for harvesting snook is ONE per harvester per day, your catch must be

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Stuck in your waterfront home in South Florida during quarantine? Whether you usually fish offshore, or you’ve never fished before, snook fishing from the dock is the perfect antidote for a bored family! If you’re stuck at the dock, here is a step by step guide to fishing for snook before season ends on May 31st!

 

Step 1: Buy a fishing license WITH a snook permit.

Snook is a highly regulated species due to its delicious white flesh and previous overfishing. It used to be on every menu in South Florida, and they don’t multiply as fast as pelagic species like mahi-mahi. If you get caught fishing without a permit, you’re in big trouble! You can purchase your permit from FWC here: https://gooutdoorsflorida.com/. The best deal is the “Saltwater

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Photo Credit: Adrenaline Rush Charters

If you’re from Florida, you already know, but if you’re new to the area, a large part of experiencing everything Florida has to offer is by eating what the natives eat- FISH! Saving the best for last, here are the top 10 fish to eat in Florida!


10. Kingfish

Some may wonder why kingfish even made this list, but the truth is that South Florida consumes a ridiculous amount of it. Also known as king mackeral, kingfish is not the best fish to eat as a main course since it tastes quite “gamey” because of its high oil content. However, commercial kingfishing is a booming industry in South Florida for a big reason- smoked fish dip. Just about every restaurant in South Florida carries this delectable

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The game offshore this weekend goes to sailfish, snappers, and gaffers. Sailfish are strong just in time for the Dust ‘Em Off Tournament, with releases in the double digits off of Palm Beach. Kite fishing with live goggle-eyes or blue runners in 100-300’ should entice a few sails. While dolphin schoolies are abundant, a few gaffers have been chasing ballyhoo and bonita strips in the 150-600’ range. Trolling with small feathers during lowlight should help you catch a few football-sized blackfin tuna, and the smaller ones can be used to catch wahoo. If you're thinking of heading to the Bahamas for the first time, read "How to Cross From Florida to the Bahamas By Boat".

Large mutton snapper have been pretty hot lately, with plenty of yellowtail action on

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Sailfish are biting from Stuart to Boca in the 150-300’ range, with a few boats releasing 10+ sails. Try kite fishing with hearty live baits like goggle-eyes or blue runners. Trolling with small feathers during lowlight should help you catch a few football-sized blackfin tuna, and the smaller ones can be used to catch wahoo, which has been hot due to this mild cold front, especially in the Bahamas. If you're thinking of heading to the Bahamas for the first time, read "How to Cross From Florida to the Bahamas By Boat".

Fair numbers of snapper have been prevalent around 100’ off of Jupiter, with a few cobia here and there as well.

The cold front has slowed snook down a bit, but mullet are still running. Live mullet or top water plugs at low-lighted

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Photo Credit: @SouthFlorida_Sailfishing

A few sailfish have been chasing flying fish relatively early in the season. Saturday or Sunday’s forecast of north winds may contribute to the bite a little, and a good bet at getting them to eat would be kite fishing with a hearty bait like goggle-eyes or blue runners in 200-400’ of water. Small dolphin have been pretty consistent offshore, as well as football-sized blackfin tuna. Target both by trolling with small-skirted bonita strips at depths of 120-500’.

Kingfish and large mutton snapper have been eating sardines near 120 – 200’, and yellowtail snapper has been showing up in strong numbers.

Inshore, the mullet run is still hot, and snook, jacks, tarpon, ladyfish, and redfish aren’t far behind

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Pictured: Shannon Discount & Capt. Michael O'Conner of Boatsitters

Offshore, football-sized blackfin tuna have been pretty easy to get ahold of in about 200-400’ of water. You can use small daisy chains or troll with feathers, but quite a few have been caught trolling with small-skirted bonita strips as well. We had a lot of success with neon green and white skirts this week, but colors are a game that changes by the minute, so try a few different ones and switch the rest out as you go if your target fish is tending to a particular color. Dolphin have been in the same areas as blackfin, and wahoo have been non-existent. On the first cold front that rolls through, we’ll have our local favorite Junkanoo Lures ready. Regardless of our lack of cold

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Grouper caught on a dead sardine bottom fishing for snapper, Photo Courtesy of Reel Intense Fishing

With the mullet run being the highlight of the past couple of weeks, most fishing has been geared toward snook, large tarpon, and amberjack chasing schools through inlets, inshore, on the beach, and at the Juno Pier. Your trustiest bait is live mullet itself, which can be found during low light periods of the day away from boat traffic. If you’re looking for a little more fun in exchange for less reliability, using top water plugs creates some exciting action as snook will strike these much harder, sometimes becoming airborne exploding on the surface.

Reef anglers should be catching some kingfish and snapper this time of year, but this week has

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