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JUPITER'S "WILD DOLPHIN PROJECT" is featured in the NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC!

Posted by Nicole Richards on Wednesday, May 13th, 2015 at 2:28pm.

The Wild Dolphin Project, the longest subaquatic dolphin study in the world is not only celebrating its 30th anniversary but is also being highlighted in the May issue of National Geographic magazine, which is out on newsstands now!

Based out of the beautiful location of Jupiter, Florida, The Wild Dolphin Project has recorded many research discoveries and techniques during the past 30 years. Vital detections have been completed in the communications, the intellect and social behaviors of dolphin pods.

Founder and Research Director of the Wild Dolphin Project, Denise Herzing, Ph.D. and her staff, students and volunteers have been working hard for their long term studies on a specific pod of free-ranging Atlantic spotted dolphins. The extensive work and recordings of the mission itself make a natural proficient source for the National Geographic Magazine featured article:It’s Time for a Conservation: Breaking the communication barrier between dolphins and humans.” This article mainly recognizes the questions: “Can we learn to speak dolphin? Can dolphins learn to speak to us? This dolphin research project, based in Jupiter, is attempting to answer that question that is profiled in May's National Geographic magazine.

“From her research vessel “Stenella” (named for spotted dolphins’ genus,) Herzing is trying to get a group of young female dolphins to associate three whistles emitted by the CHAT box with three toys: a scarf, a rope and sargassum, the stringy seaweed that dolphins commonly play with in the wild. The idea is to build an artificial language or interface that will one day allow her and the dolphins to “talk. In another project, the WDP is working with the University of California at San Diego to index 26 years of recorded underwater dolphin “talk,” to try to discern patterns in the ways the mammals communicate with each other. Dolphins, with their close-knit social groups and large mammalian brains, are incredibly “talkative.” Scientists like Herzing have long wondered what all that garrulous audible and sometimes inaudible (at least, to humans) communication means.”

The Wild Dolphin Project may have taken a step toward understanding it!

1 Response to "JUPITER'S "WILD DOLPHIN PROJECT" is featured in the NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC!"

Patricia wood wrote: My granddaughter is working on this project.
So proud of her.

Posted on Wednesday, July 22nd, 2015 at 8:29pm.

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